How to Crush a Creative Project In A Time-Crunch

How to Crush a Creative Project In A Time-Crunch

My team at Rhino has become known and trusted for delivering magic in a pinch. 

We've produced award winning projects in less than 2 weeks; projects that should have been months in development. I'm proud of this, and love wowing clients with how well we listen, understand, direct, and execute. 

If you want to crush a creative project and don't have much time, here's how it can be a reality (written to the client perspective): 

- Clarity and Cohesion of Vision: this may seem obvious, but make sure you are working with a creative team who gets your vision and that you can clearly communicate it; using videos, drawing pictures, mood boards, playing them a song, whatever. The key is that you share as much vision as possible and that they listen well. 

- Trust: there must be a healthy amount of trust in the creative partner's style and execution tactics. The more trust there is in the relationship, the faster every step of the project can move. But if you're constantly second-guessing every decision, this will cripple your team's ability to deliver.  

- Creative Flexibility: Similarly, there must be wiggle room for creative boundaries to be pushed.  Obviously brand standards and guidelines must be followed, but allowing for the artist to be the artist will help immensely.  

- Reliability: Be sure that you've picked a partner who has a proven record of delivering on time and with excellence.

- Have Budget: Good, Fast, Cheap. You get to pick two. In this scenario, you've already selected good and fast, hopefully you have budget to work with.  

- Timely Communication: you need your creative partner to move fast, and you'll give them a lot of creative freedom, but they will still have questions. It is imperative that you are responsive and decisive. If we don't get a response over two days, this will delay the final deadline. 

- Unified Feedback: don't send the rough version of the project to ten of your co workers and ask them to give feedback, then send that to the creative team to decipher. I've seen situations where this has happened and the feedback was often in direct conflict with each other. This is obviously a huge wrench to toss in the process.  

There's sure to be some things I missed, let me know if you think something should be added!

- KR  

Yes, Yes, Yes, No, No, No

Yes, Yes, Yes, No, No, No

Saving Your Soul

Saving Your Soul